Performance Management

Since hiring doesn’t seem to be the biggest issue right now, I thought I’d jump to managing the performance of your existing employees.

Setting goals

In First Break all the Rules, the authors challenge some of the conventional wisdom with respect to management. General philosophy is that people don’t change much. So, don’t waste time trying to put in what is not present. Instead, try to leverage what is already in. That is hard enough

For instance, when selecting the ‘right person’ for a job, you might think that finding someone with the prior experience, the right level of intelligence, and the necessary willpower would be most important. But, the book asserts that talent is more important.

Based on this philosophy of hiring people for their talents then drives how you set their goals and objectives. You should focus on the right outcomes and let your talented people define their own path. But, this does not mean let them do anything that they want, still follow required steps.

Motivating people

Also based on the revelation that people don’t fundamentally change, you are better off finding out what motivates an employee rather than pestering them about their shortcomings. Position them to use their strength to their advantage and adjust, as necessary, to compensate for their weaknesses. This defies the ‘golden rule’ of treating everyone as you would have them treat you. The manager is challenges to customize their style to elicit the maximum performance from the individual employees. Also, a bit counter-intuitive is the strategy of spending time with your top performers rather than fixating your attention and time on others.

Climbing the ladderThis perspective also then shapes how you develop your organization. You can’t simply assume that it is best to promote people to the next rung of management. You’ll end up putting employees into roles that they don’t want and in which they won’t succeed. Instead, find positions in which individuals can be successful and ‘create heroes’ by recognizing them for excelling at what they are good at. Also, create ‘safety nets’ that allow people to try new responsibilities without fear of failure.

Advertisements

One Response to Performance Management

  1. […] Performance Management Possibly related posts: (automatically generated)Project PlanningProject CommunicationsProject Development – Stay on TaskProject Integration Management […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: